Celebrating The Diva Complex

-A +A
0

Aretha Franklin, and Mary J. Blige, are just a few who epitomize the term, and wear the title proudly. Before them, Josephine Baker, and Eartha Kitt, took the title before it was a title, and wore it as their crown and glory.

[Runway Talk]

 

The diva in American history was originally used to describe an operatic vocalist, who was almost always a soprano.


Nowadays, it is used to describe singers, mostly African Americans with a certain level of success, and an extreme amount of talent.

Aretha Franklin, and Mary J. Blige, are just a few who epitomize the term, and wear the title proudly. Before them, Josephine Baker, and Eartha Kitt, took the title before it was a title, and wore it as their crown and glory. Their success and legacy left an impact on fashion and the industry as a whole. If you do not believe me, look at someone the couture collections on the runway, and then observe old Josephine Baker costumes. The similarities are unbelievable.

With this being said, many urban fashionistas have taken the looks and attitudes from these ground-breaking divas, and tried to incorporate them into their own personal wardrobes. This is certainly an inspired idea, however with everything, moderation and consciousness is important.

When you combine music videos with clips of ready to wear shows, what’s produced is a contemporary diva’s wardrobe, and every diva wannabe, and fashion recluse, will want to attach themselves to the lifestyle of the divas they admire. Every good wardrobe should have a diva element to it. I call this element, the Diva Complex.


The wardrobe is a splendid creation with colors, shapes, and cuts that we love with a passion that makes our spouse question the vows we may have taken. Despite this, the elaboration is what makes the wardrobe an amazing thing to have, and every wardrobe should have a diva element.

Later in history, the word diva took on a negative definition, implying that the diva is a manipulative and high maintenance performer. However, it is the attitude of the diva that people buy. When purchasing clothing for a wardrobe, it is the attitude that must be envisioned with every piece.

If you cannot be the best person you can be in that blouse, I suggest putting it back on the rack; anything else would be a violation of a fashion deadly sin. For what does it profit a person to gain the wardrobe and lose their style? Wardrobe with no style is something that should not be allowed.

When looking for the diva element in fashion, look for the attitude. They call me crazy, but I am able to feel every emotion and perspective in every piece that I see on the runways. This perspective is not hard to find, as long as you look for the right thing and attitude is always at the top of the list. If you find yourself in a clothing store, especially a high end clothing store, look for the perspective in each piece. Even the plainest piece, like a simple pencil skirt, can be the quintessential diva piece for your wardrobe. Remember, it is not the piece but the attitude inside of the piece that sells.

Personality is important to a wardrobe. Since a majority of urban women have a diva element to their lives, their attitudes should be what people first notice when they are seen. If this is done correctly, the clothing along with everything else will be noticed.


Real divas move with grace. Being over the top is not something that is not necessary for them. Even in their fashionably plain-state, they naturally reach diva status in the way that they carry themselves in their clothing.



To comment, to subscribe to or advertise in New York’s leading Pan African weekly investigative newspaper, please call (212) 481-7745 or send a note to Milton@blackstarnews.com

Also visit out sister publications Harlem Business News www.harlembusinessnews.com publications and The Groove Music magazine www.thegroovemag.com

"Speaking Truth To Power."

Also Check Out...

FRENCH FIRM LOSES BID TO OWN
Living in the City
El Puente Artists And Los Sures
TNC's Fifth "Dream Up
LIBERIANS RALLY IN RESPONSE TO
NIGERIAN COMIC TURNS ON FANS