Five Guys Named Moe Is MO’velous!

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“Five Guys Named Moe,� was produced by AUDELCO Award winner Carl Clay, founder of the Black Spectrum Theatre, directed by Bette Howard, staged managed by Fulton C. Hodges and Christine Gaines.

[Theater]

 

I had a good time out in Roy Wilkins Park on Sunday where The Black Spectrum Theatre, which is in its 37th season of entertaining the community, is housed in Jamaica, Queens. 

The show “Five Guys Named Moe” which opened October 20th is running through December 9th and is well worth the trip to the theatre, located at 177th Street and Baisley Boulevard.

This musical by Clarke Peters begins with the character Nomax,  played by Abraham Blue, feeling downhearted and dejected because his lady left him.  Neither drink nor rationalization makes Nomax feel any better.  He just doesn’t understand why his woman left him, never mind his ignoring her birthday nor doing any of those little things she asked of him.  Why can’t his sweet Lorraine understand that a man’s got to do what a man’s got to do?  What do women want anyway?  That’s the question Nomax is pondering as he drifts off to sleep to the sound of his radio. 

Still drowsy, Nomax is suddenly awakened, startled by the five specters before him.  He wonders whether he is still dreaming or whether the universe has heard his appeal and sent the answers to his question via the sudden appearance of five musical guys, all who are named Moe.’  

Now, these five guys don’t seem to have all the answers themselves.  They bicker among themselves and at first stroke Nomax’s ego.  They pound their point home via a cadre of music and dance numbers.  These Five Guys named Eat Moe (played by Jarvis Manning, Jr.,) Big Moe (Donald Hinson), No Moe (Leon Rogers), Four Eyed Moe amusingly portrayed by Roy Coleman and L’il Moe (John Edwards) are as different from one another as can be.  They cajole, bicker, prod, wheedle, tease, support and comfort Nomax via the medleys of Louis Jordan, the saxophonist and composer from the 1930s, whose musical jazz style is credited as having paved the way for the 1950’s rock n’ roll era.

The audience was also dragged into the hilarity as the characters encouraged the crowd to sing Push Ka Pi Shi-Pie. Don’t’ ask what it means…it’s simply a light amusing ditty that is fun to sing.  Each song aided in telling the story and touched upon the personalities of the Five Guys:  The characters sang tunes like: “I  Like Em Fat Like That”, “Messy Bessy”, “Pettin’ and Pokin,’” “Azure Te,” “Safe, Sane and Single,” “Dad Gum Your Hide Boy,” “Five Guys Name Moe”” Let the Good Times Roll,” “Caldonia,” “Hurry Home,” “ Is You Is Or Is You Ain’t My Baby” and “Don’t Let The Sun Catch You Crying,” to name a few.

“Five Guys Named Moe,” was produced by AUDELCO Award winner Carl Clay, founder of the Black Spectrum Theatre, directed by Bette Howard, staged managed by Fulton C. Hodges and Christine Gaines. The costumes by Marcha Tracey were colorful stylish and well coordinated. The set, designed by Harlan D. Penn, was imaginative; the numerous dance routines were choreography by Troy Blackwell.

If you are looking for an evening of fun call the Box Office at 718-723-1800 or check out the Black Spectrum Theatre website: www.BlackSpectrum.com.  Show days are Friday and Saturday at 8:00 p.m., and Sundays at 4:00 p.m.

 

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