SIXTH ANNUAL BLACK PANTHER PARTY FILM FESTIVAL

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GET YOUR TICKETS NOW FOR THE 6TH ANNUAL BLACK PANTHER PARTY FILM FESTIVAL

For the sixth year running, The Maysles Cinema is proud to host the Black Panther Party Film Festival. Produced by the Black Panther Commemoration Committee, NY, these two upcoming consecutive weekends (Sept. 26th-27th, Oct. 3rd-4th) capture the experiences of political prisoners, along with compelling live Q&A sessions with BPP members, featured filmmakers and film subjects, activists and legal experts.

The opening and closing film of the 2014 festival is Free Angela and All Political Prisoners, which will be shown on Friday, September 26th and Saturday, October 4th. Opening night's screening will be followed by a Q&A with the film's director, Shola Lynch and four original members of the Black Panther Political Party.

The festival will feature many moving, eye-opening short and feature-length documentary films, and will include a tribute to Herman Wallace, one of themembers of the Angola 3, who passed away on October 4th.

Proceeds from the festival are used as commissary for political prisoners.

NOTE FOR MEMBERS: There are a very limited number of member tickets for opening night.

Email reservations@maysles.org if you are a member and wish to reserve a seat.

Otherwise please use the advance ticketing link below or please donate at the door as proceeds from the festival are used as commissary for political prisoners.

Friday, September 26th, 7:00pm

"But You Can't Kill a Revolution" 17 min.

A TV network investigation team visits a small Louisiana town to film racial profiling and the police killing of an unarmed grandfather on his porch. There they find out that the town is also home to the grave of Black Panther Party Leader, Fred Hampton, and the dynamic Illinois State Chapter Chairman. Hampton was killed in an illegal Chicago police raid in 1969. Activists around the world remember "Chairman Fred", but so does the Ku Klux Klan. "You can jail a revolutionary, but you can't jail the revolution! You can kill a revolutionary, but you can't kill the revolution!!!" - Fred Hampton

"George Jackson The Freedom Archives," 27 min.

George Lester Jackson (September 23, 1941 - August 21, 1971). This extraordinary video is from a 16mm film "work print" made in 1971-1972, and includes interviews with George Jackson, Georgia Jackson (George and Jonathan Jackson's mother) and Angela Davis, while she was still in the Marin County Courthouse Jail, before her acquittal. The Freedom Archives have not been able to identify the other prisoners. As you will see, the film has no titles or other credits.

"Free Angela and All Political Prisoners" Shola Lynch, 2013, 102 min.

A documentary that chronicles the life of young college professor Angela Davis, and how her social activism implicates her in a botched kidnapping attempt that ends with a shootout, four dead, and her name on the FBI's 10 most wanted list.

Q&A with filmmaker Shola Lynch, and Black Panther Party Members BJ, Pam Hanna, Claudia Williams ad C. "Bullwhip" Innis. Saturday, September 27th, 4:00pm "Voice of Liberation: Jalil Abdul Mutaqim" Eve Goldberg and Claude Marks, 2002, 20 min.

Jalil Abdul Muntaqim (formerly Anthony Bottom) was 19 years old when he was arrested. He is a former member of the Black Panther Party and the Black Liberation Army, and is one of the longest held political prisoners in the world.

This documentary is a unique opportunity to hear Jalil's story. While in San Quentin prison in California in 1976, Jalil launched the National Prisoners Campaign to Petition the United Nations to recognize the existence of political prisoners in the United States and in 1997 Jalil initiated the Jericho Movement.

Over 6,000 supporters gathered in the Jericho '98 march in Washington DC and the Bay Area to demand amnesty for US political prisoners on the basis of international law. The Jericho Amnesty Movement aims to gain the recognition by the U.S. government and the United Nations that political prisoners exist in this country and that on the basis of international law, they should be granted amnesty because of the political nature of their cases.

"Manufacturing Guilt"  Stephen Vittoria, 2013, 40 min.

Manufacturing Guiltt, the short film from Stephen Vittoria, producer and director of Mumia: Long Distance Revolutionary, takes on the colossus of Abu-Jamal's contentious case, distilling a mountain of evidence and years of oft-repeated falsehoods to the most fundamental elements of police and prosecutorial misconduct that illustrate a clear and conscious effort to frame Mumia Abu-Jamal for the murder of patrolman Daniel Faulkner. Based on the actual record of investigations and court filings from 1995 to 2003-evidence denied by the courts and ignored in the press--Manufacturing Guilt cuts through the years of absurdities and overt racism to produce a clear picture of how Abu-Jamal's guilt was manufactured and his innocence suppressed beginning only moments after he and Faulkner were found shot in the early morning hours of December 9th, 1981. This historic and courageous film is the

"Mountains That Take Wing: Angela Davis & Yuri Kochiyama" C.A. Griffith & H.L.T. Quan, 2009, 97 min.

Mountains That Take Wing features conversations that span 13 years between two formidable women whose lives and political work remain at the epicenter of the most important civil rights struggles in the US. Through the intimacy and depth of conversations, we learn about Davis, an internationally renowned scholar-activist and 88-year-old Kochiyama, a revered grassroots community activist and 2005 Nobel Peace Prize nominee's shared experiences as political prisoners and their profound passion for justice.

On subjects ranging from the vital but largely erased role of women in social movements of the 20th century, community empowerment, to the prison industrial complex, war and the cultural arts, Davis' and Kochiyama's comments offer critical lessons for understanding our nation's most important social movements and tremendous hope for its youth and the future.

Q&A with Q&A Rachel Wolkenstein, legal consultant, and Keith Cook, Mumia Abu-Jamal's Brother and moderated by BPP Member Shabaom.MOUNTAINS THAT TAKE WING: ANGELA DAVIS & YURI KOCHIYAMA A TV network investigation team visits a small Louisiana town to film racial profiling and the police killing of an unarmed grandfather on his porch. There they find out that the town is also home to the grave of Black Panther Party Leader, Fred Hampton, and the dynamic Illinois State Chapter Chairman. Hampton was killed in an illegal Chicago police raid in 1969. Activists around the world remember "Chairman Fred", but so does the Klu Klux Klan. "You can jail a revolutionary, but you can't jail the revolution! You can kill a revolutionary, but you can't kill the revolution!!!" - Fred Hampton

"Manufacturing Guilt"  Stephen Vittoria, 2013, 40 min.

Manufacturing Guilt, the short film from Stephen Vittoria, producer and director of Mumia: Long Distance Revolutionary, takes on the colossus of Abu-Jamal's contentious case, distilling a mountain of evidence and years of oft-repeated falsehoods to the most fundamental elements of police and prosecutorial misconduct that illustrate a clear and conscious effort to frame Mumia Abu-Jamal for the murder of patrolman Daniel Faulkner. Based on the actual record of investigations and court filings from 1995 to 2003-evidence denied by the courts and ignored in the press--Manufacturing Guilt cuts through the years of absurdities and overt racism to produce a clear picture of how Abu-Jamal's guilt was manufactured and his innocence suppressed beginning only moments after he and Faulkner were found shot in the early morning hours of December 9th, 1981. This historic and courageous film is the perfect companion to Long Distance Revolutionary -a film that is unequivocal in its force regarding Abu-Jamal's innocence.

"Let the Fire Burn" Jason Osder, 2013, 95 Min.

A history of the conflict of the City of Philadelphia and the Black Liberation organization, MOVE, that led to the disastrously violent final confrontation in 1985. In the astonishingly gripping Let the Fire Burn, director Jason Osder has crafted that rarest of cinematic objects: a found-footage film that unfurls with the tension of a great thriller. On May 13, 1985, a longtime feud between the city of Philadelphia and controversial radical urban group MOVE came to a deadly climax. By order of local authorities, police dropped military-grade explosives onto a MOVE-occupied rowhouse. TV cameras captured the conflagration that quickly escalated-and resulted in the tragic deaths of eleven people (including five children) and the destruction of 61 homes. It was only later discovered that authorities decided to "...let the fire burn." Using only archival news coverage and interviews, first-time filmmaker Osder has brought to life one of the most tumultuous and largely forgotten clashes between government and citizens in modern American history.

Q&A with Ramona Africa, activist and Move bombing survivor and Keith Cook, Mumia Abu-Jamal's brother and moderated by BPP Member Shabaom.

For more films and dates/listings please visit the website

  

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