While in London, Opposition Chief Predicts Uganda regime-change soon

-A +A
0

“I can see change in the horizons. Change will come very soon, because people are very strong,” said Dr. Besigye

[Global: Uganda Diaspora]

A major protest against the brutal rule of Gen. Yoweri Museveni in the East African country took place outside the House of Commons, the British Parliament, in London, last Friday.

The U.K., as with the U.S., are the major financial and military backers of the Ugandan regime.

The Friday Anti-Museveni protesters waved Ugandan flags. The protest included representatives from Uganda’s major political parties, and supporters of  FDC leader Dr. Kizza Besigye who is widely believed to have won the February elections. Dr. Besigye, who was in London, said that: “I support every individual who uses any means to demand for power.”

“You’re doing a very good job, and it is the right cause,” said Dr. Besigye whilst responding to whether, he supports the UUPDF group that has been staging a weekly demonstration outside the British parliament since April this year. He added that: “This is not Besigye’s problem. It is a problem of everybody. You need to be the agent for change.”

In an interview with this newspaper, Dr. Besigye said that he, “cannot rule out the violent revolution.”

“I can see change in the horizons. Change will come very soon, because people are very strong,” said the former personal doctor of Museveni. 

Dr. Besigye, has been tormented by Museveni’s brutal forces since the February 18, presidential elections.  He has been one of the main leaders of the Walk-to Work protests, organized by Activities for Change (A4C) which is meant to highlight the double –digit inflation and the rising cost of essential commodities. 

The government claims, that the walk-to-work campaigns are aimed at toppling the regime or harming the economy of the country and it has since clamped down on the protests. Several arrests have previously been made and some of whom have been charged with treason charges. People have been shot and killed in earlier protests.

Gen. Museveni has also proposed to have the country’s Constitution amended to deny bail and keep suspects arrested during protests in detention for at least 180 days. He also suggested that; there was a need to strengthen the law governing   bail and he argued that protestors should not be granted bail in the same way like those committed murder, rapes of minors, economic sabotage and rioting.
Whilst majority of Ugandans live on less than $1 (£1.25) a day, President Museveni’s kith and kin get medical treatment abroad, the protestors contend. They also allege that even when corrupt officials are implicated in a number of scandals, they are not prosecuted or reprimanded.

In recent weeks a member of Parliament in Uganda has charged that several senior government ministers --prime minister Amama Mbabazi, foreign minister Sam Kutesa, and interior minister Hillary Onek-- accepted about $25 million in bribes from foreign oil companies.

More than two-thirds of the population under the age of 24 suffer from 50 percent employment. “But when we talk or criticize this, it becomes a treasonable offense,” one protestor and organizer, Moses Luzinda, said. "Together we fight against poverty, corruption and injustice," the protesters outside the UK Parliament said.

There were sporadic bursts of music amidst the speeches delivered by opposition politicians from UUPDF, DP, FDC, UPC, and other human rights activists.

"The regime is extensively weakened today and it’s is only thriving on intimidations, bribing the people, coercion and force,” added Luzinda, the Chairman of UUPDF a pressure group that has persistently been organizing the demos here in London.

"We've had enough of being left on the sidelines. Let Ugandans decide who will rule them in clean, fair elections,” said Mr Luznda, adding that: “People shouldn’t be deterred by the recent call by some clergymen.” He was referring to a call by Uganda’s Archbishop Cyprian Kizito Lwanga who called on Ugandans to shun protests because politicians use them to gain political capital at the expense of innocent civilians.

"These demonstrations will continue until the government and the president comes to a consensus with the people of Uganda," said Sarah Kamulali a prominent Ugandan.


"Speaking Truth To Empower."

Also Check Out...

Politics As Usual
Politics As Usual
NYC Tests Mali Traveler For Ebola
It Never Gets Old
BRITS HONOR FIRST BLACK ARMY
A Tale of Two Cities