Mastering eLearning Technology

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[Business News]

Summ: Unlike traditional radio, they are able to broadcast programs on topics not normally heard on the airwaves. Everything from natural health and spirituality to sexual issues and political matters are covered, with topics and points of view expanding constantly as new hosts add their programs.

As the popularity of eLearning continues to increase, many are finding there are some problems associated with this relatively new form of internet-based learning. Differences in formats, variable memory requirements--even the reliability of some programs all make for occasional disappoints and frustrations. Georgia Jones, however, is making the eLearning experience better as she helps transform this new technology.

Jones is president of NewVoices Inc. (http://NewVoices.com), an Internet-based company specializing in eLearning, information services and Web radio. NewVoices utilizes audio programming designed to provide a sound quality normally reserved for broadcast radio. That alone, says Jones, is a quality that separates her company from the many other Internet-based audio sites on the market today. “It takes experience to master the intricate complexities of Internet-based sound,” she says. “And, even more importantly, to understand information structures that communicate ideas effectively.”

NewVoices offers multiple disciplines of expertise within the company. The Web site hosts audio stations and a wide variety of educational radio shows, all of which are available for download in MP3 format. Two of the most unusual networks are TeenTalkNetwork.com, which is radio by, for and about teens, and MooseMeals.com, a forum for political and social discussion.

Additionally, the company makes it possible for other Web site owners and organizations to structure their own educational programs, making them available through the NewVoices.com Web site as well as the owner’s home site. This provides them with production support, server space for large audio and video files, and solid industry expertise. “We have guest hosts from all over the world,” says Jones. “It keeps things fresh and brings in different points of view. We have over 15,000 regular listeners at the moment.”

In one area in particular, the company has seen an increased level of interest: their full course design service. Under this service, NewVoices takes a company’s own materials and information and develops an eLearning course designed to take advantage of both the latest technologies and a state of the art understanding of how such technology can improve learning.  This is a rapidly expanding area in education, particularly adult learning.

“Full course design is great for companies needing to give presentations to large-scale audiences in diverse locations,” adds Jones. “I’m excited about the direction this service is taking and the interest and support of professionals.”
Despite Jones’ excitement about the company’s array of services, NewVoice’s radio programs draw the most attention because of their unique format. Unlike traditional radio, they are able to broadcast programs on topics not normally heard on the airwaves. Everything from natural health and spirituality to sexual issues and political matters are covered, with topics and points of view expanding constantly as new hosts add their programs. It’s the combination of good programming, widespread availability, quality sound, and the interactivity that is the basic ingredient of the Internet that Jones and NewVoices capitalize on.

“There are people who have something to say and those who have something to sell. We are interested in the ones with something special to teach the world,” adds Jones.

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