Southern Comforts Holistic Health Fair

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Saturday, November 15, 2008 1:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m at the Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture, located at 53 Prospect Park West bet. 1st and 2ndStreets in Brooklyn, New York.

Pavilions will include Sound Therapy, Reiki, Quigong, Massage Therapy, Reflexology, Handcrafted Jewelry & Crystals, Herbs/Vitamins, Oils, Natural Skin Care Products, Standard, Vegetarian, Vegan Cuisine and much more.

Southern Comforts will be presenting a Holistic Health Fair
Saturday, November 15, 2008 1:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m at the Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture, located at 53 Prospect Park West bet. 1st and 2ndStreets in Brooklyn, New York.

Pavilions will include Sound Therapy, Reiki, Quigong, Massage Therapy, Reflexology, Handcrafted Jewelry & Crystals, Herbs/Vitamins, Oils, Natural Skin Care Products, Standard, Vegetarian, Vegan Cuisine and much more.  

“For the past two  years, I have also been working with cancer, HIV and diabetes patients with great results.   Many hospitals are beginning to permit Reiki practitioners to work with patients especially for pain management.   Also, I have been participating in Reiki healing circles around the city including Bed Stuy.   If for no other reason, my desire to give this Health Fair is to help folks appreciate the beauty, peace and love within healing energy.   Consider your adventure on November 15th as a day at a sanctuary providing inner peace and for some, healing (on various levels within the mind, body and spirit),” said Rev. Nettie Paisley, President of Southern Comforts and Founder/Organizer of the event.

Reiki, Reflexology and Chair Massages
$1.00 per minute - 10 minute minimum
Sound Therapy Class 3:00 PM- 4:00 PM
$30.00 per person
(includes Qigong breathing, meditation,
energy work, music)
 
LOCATION:
Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture
53 Prospect Park West bet. 1st and 2ndStreets
Directions: www.bsec.org
 
For info and vendor or class application southcomforts@aol.com  

What is Reiki?

Reiki is a healing practice that originated in Japan. Reiki practitioners place their hands lightly on or just above the person receiving treatment, with the goal of facilitating the person's own healing response. In the United States, Reiki is part of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This fact sheet provides a general overview of Reiki and suggests sources for additional information.

People use Reiki to promote overall health and well-being. Reiki is also used by people who are seeking relief from disease-related symptoms and the side effects of conventional medical treatments. Reiki has historically been practiced as a form of self-care.  Increasingly, it is also provided by health care professionals in a variety of clinical settings. Scientific research is under way to learn more about how Reiki may work, its possible effects on health, and diseases and conditions for which it may be helpful. Tell your health care providers about any complementary and alternative practices you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care.

Reiki is based on the idea that there is a universal (or source) energy that supports the body's innate healing abilities. Practitioners seek to access this energy, allowing it to flow to the body and facilitate healing.

Although generally practiced as a form of self-care, Reiki can be received from someone else and may be offered in a variety of health care settings, including medical offices, hospitals, and clinics. It can be practiced on its own or along with other CAM therapies or conventional medical treatments.

Practitioners with appropriate training may perform Reiki from a distance, that is, on clients who are not physically present in the office or clinic.

Uses
A 2002 national survey by the National Center for Health Statistics and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) on adult Americans' use of CAM found that 1.1 percent of the more than 31,000 participants had ever used Reiki for health purposes.  Adjusted to nationally representative numbers, this percentage means that at the time of the survey, more than 2.2 million adults in the United States had ever used Reiki.

People use Reiki for relaxation, stress reduction, and symptom relief, in efforts to improve overall health and well-being. Reiki has been used by people with anxiety, chronic pain, HIV/AIDS, and other health conditions, as well as by people recovering from surgery or experiencing side effects from cancer treatments. Reiki has also been given to people who are dying (and to their families and caregivers) to help impart a sense of peace.

Effects and Safety
Clients may experience a deep state of relaxation during a Reiki session. They might also feel warm, tingly, sleepy, or refreshed.

Reiki appears to be generally safe, and no serious side effects have been reported.

Training, Licensing, and Certification.  No special background or credentials are needed to receive training.  However, Reiki must be learned from an experienced teacher or a Master; it cannot be self-taught. The specific techniques taught can vary greatly.

Training in traditional Reiki has three degrees (levels), each focusing on a different aspect of practice. Each degree includes one or more initiations (also called attunements or empowerments). Receiving an initiation is believed to activate the ability to access Reiki energy.

If You Are Thinking About Using Reiki
Do not use Reiki as a replacement for proven conventional care or to postpone seeing a doctor about a medical problem.
NCCAM-Funded Research

Some recent NCCAM-supported studies have been investigating:

How Reiki might work Whether Reiki is effective and safe for treating the symptoms of fibromyalgia Reiki's possible impact on the well-being and quality of life in people with advanced AIDS The possible effects of Reiki on disease progression and/or anxiety in people with prostate cancer Whether Reiki can help reduce nerve pain and cardiovascular risk in people with type 2 diabetes.

History
The word "Reiki" is derived from two Japanese words: rei, or universal, and ki, or life energy. Current Reiki practice can be traced to the spiritual teachings of Mikao Usui in Japan during the early 20th century. Usui's teachings included meditative techniques and healing practices. One of Usui's students, Chujiro Hayashi, further developed the healing practices, placing less emphasis on the meditative techniques. An American named Hawayo Takata learned Reiki from Hayashi in Japan and introduced it to Western cultures in the late 1930s.  The type of Reiki practiced and taught by Hayashi and Takata may be considered traditional Reiki. Numerous variations (or schools) of Reiki have since been developed and are currently practiced.

Reiki is based on the idea that there is a universal (or source) energy that supports the body's innate healing abilities. Practitioners seek to access this energy, allowing it to flow to the body and facilitate healing.

Although generally practiced as a form of self-care, Reiki can be received from someone else and may be offered in a variety of health care settings, including medical offices, hospitals, and clinics. It can be practiced on its own or along with other CAM therapies or conventional medical treatments.

Practitioners with appropriate training may perform Reiki from a distance, that is, on clients who are not physically present in the office or clinic.

Clients may experience a deep state of relaxation during a Reiki session. They might also feel warm, tingly, sleepy, or refreshed.

Reiki appears to be generally safe, and no serious side effects have been reported.

Training, Licensing, and Certification
No special background or credentials are needed to receive training.  However, Reiki must be learned from an experienced teacher or a Master; it cannot be self-taught. The specific techniques taught can vary
greatly.

Training in traditional Reiki has three degrees (levels), each focusing on a different aspect of practice. Each degree includes one or more initiations (also called attunements or empowerments). Receiving an initiation is believed to activate the ability to access Reiki energy.

If You Are Thinking About Using Reiki
Do not use Reiki as a replacement for proven conventional care or to postpone seeing a doctor about a medical problem.
NCCAM-Funded Research

Some recent NCCAM-supported studies have been investigating:

How Reiki might work Whether Reiki is effective and safe for treating the symptoms of fibromyalgia Reiki's possible impact on the well-being and quality of life in people with advanced AIDS The possible effects of Reiki on disease progression and/or anxiety in people with prostate cancer Whether Reiki can help reduce nerve pain and cardiovascular risk in people with type 2 diabetes.

To learn more about Southern Comforts Holistic Health Care or for vendor or class application southcomforts@aol.com 

Learn more about Reiki at www.nccam.nih.gov

FAQs

Q:   You have listed practitioner and vendor on your application to rent space.   What is the difference?
A:    A practitioner provides a service and is paid for their time.   Most of the practitioners at the
       Health  Fair will be focusing on treatments by way of energy (chi).   It is important to operate in a
       quiet environment is quiet to insure the best connection between client and practitioner (relaxation
       music and your relaxed breathing would be the only sounds heard, although, sometimes there is very
       quiet chatter between client and practitioner).   Clients request a treatment at Health Fairs usually
       for two reasons:  to enjoy more of their current service, or as an introduction to alternative
       therapies and process the differences between allopathic (conventional) medicine.  Clients usually
       receive a card or brochure for further education and service.  The practitioner's goal is to assist in
       healing the body and helping the client appreciate the value of natural self care.
       A vendor provides a product to sell and customers either purchase the product or become educated
       about  the product.   There is a great deal of interaction, as a result, the environment is not quiet and
       talking becomes the best connection between customer and practitioner.  
 
Q.   Will the vendors and practitioners be mixed together?
A.   No the vendors are on the first floor, the practitioners will be on the second floor in the quietness of
      the library and the food will be in the basement.
 
Q.   Do I have to undress for the practitioner services?
A.   Energy practices can be done with clothing on.  
 
Q.   Do I have to lay down on a table for the services?
A.   Energy services can be done on a table or in a chair?
 
Q.   Are these services safe and will you be pushing religion?
A.   The services are safe and no one will be pushing religion.   As a matter of fact, you will most likely
       become so relaxed, you don't want to talk during the service.  
 
Q.   Why do practitioners pay less than vendors to rent a space?   
A.    Practitioners provide an immediate service based on time and skills.   There is a standard   
       price per minute, at Health Fairs, it is usually $1.00 per minute with a 10 minute minimum.   Vendors
       provide products that are sold at various prices for different functions i.e. jewelry, skin care, etc.  
       Vendors also interact with more customers than practitioners---practitioners work one on one while
       vendors can work one on one or talk to a group simultaneously.
 
Q.   What is the admission fee?   
A.   Admission if free, just pay for the services or products you want.   You do not have to make  
      reservations.   You can stay as long as you like.
 
Q.   Can I try more than one service?    Will there be a problem if I do?
A.   Yes, I just suggest that you give yourself a few minutes before you move to another service and consider
       drinking some water.   No, problems, only the rewards of even more relaxation and inner peace.
 
Q.    What is the difference between vegetarian and vegan foods?   
A.     Vegans do not eat dairy products.
 
Q.    Do I have to try a service?
A.    You can just shop and purchase/experience the vendor products which are designed for natural self
       care.   You can purchase the delicious and healthy foods (yes, I do mean delicious and healthy).   You
       can explore all the options.   You can mix and mingle, it is a safe place and all are encouraged to enter
       with an open heart!
 
Q.    Where is the best place to get more information on these alternative services?
A.    Reiki, Reflexology, Massages, Chi, etc. you can search on the Internet but remember some sites are
       full of sensational claims.  I have tried to select ethical practitioners who are interested in the "greatest
       good" of their clients.  Also,  select vendors who are interested in providing the best quality products for
       the "greatest good" of their customers.


To learn more about Southern Comforts Holistic Health Care or for vendor or class application southcomforts@aol.com

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