Global Nuclear Politics: Is Israeli Attack On Iran Imminent?

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Nations know acquiring nuclear weapons is an efficient deterrent against military invasion. The juxtaposition between the cautious diplomacy the West employs when dealing with North Korea, in contrast to the violent invasion and toppling of Iraq’s Saddam Hussein and Libya’s Muammar al-Quathafi has made that crystal clear.

[Speaking Truth To Power]


For months, there has been much bellicose bellowing about
the dangers of Iran’s nuclear program by Washington and Israel. Given last week’s explosive events, will we soon see a
catastrophic attack on Iran by the Israeli Government?

On Thursday, the FBI held a 90-minute video teleconference
with each of its 56 field offices to address the recent bombing attacks that
have transpired in Georgia, India and Thailand—and their presumed connection to
Iran.  The meeting, which was led by the
FBI’s Assistant Director Ralph Boelter, also apparently assessed the
possibility that Iran, or its allies such as Hezbollah, may attack American
interests if Israel launches a strike against Iran and its controversial nuclear
program.

Anxiety, over Iran and its nuclear enrichment ambitions, has
been heightened in recent months with Western nations, spearheaded by Washington
and London, calling for sanctions. Accusations last October that Iranian
agents tried to assassinate Saudi Arabian Ambassador Abdel al-Jubeir did not
help matters. And the coordinated attacks have made a tense situation more
volatile.

Last week’s bombings took place in the Georgia (the country),
India and Thailand. In Georgia and India two Israeli diplomats’ cars were
reportedly targeted. In the India attack four people were wounded—including the
wife of an Israeli military attaché. Those bombings have also been connected to
the foiled mission in Thailand that was exposed last week when an explosion
erupted in a residential area of Bangkok.

Thai police arrested
Mohammad
Hazaei, 42
and Saeid Moradi, 28, who had his leg
blown off during the blasts. Another suspect,
Masoud
Sedaghatzadeh, 31,
was detained by Malaysian authorities and is expected
to be extradited to Thailand. Two other suspects,
Norouzi Shayan Ali
Akbar, 57
and a woman named Rohani Laila, 31, remain
at large and are presumed to have fled to Iran.

The suspects, who were identified as Iranian, are said to
have fled the house where the blast occurred. Thai officials found bombs in the
house and it is surmised Israeli diplomats were probably being targeted. This
week, a court in Thailand
said Mohammad Hazaei could be held indefinitely
for up to another 12 days. The bombing incidents in Thailand, India and
Georgia, has some—especially Israel—pointing the finger at Iran.


"Iran is a
threat to the stability of the world. They are targeting innocent
diplomats," said Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. "The
international community has to denounce the Iranian actions and to indicate red
lines concerning the Iranian aggression."
  In recent weeks, many countries including the United
States have been pushing European nation towards greater economic sanctions
against Iran due to Iran’s determination to continue its nuclear program. The U.S., other Western
nations, and Israel accuse Iran of having
aspirations for enriching uranium to make a nuclear bomb. Tehran maintains that
its program is for peaceful purposes and has remained defiant against the call
for sanctions and has denied any involvement in the recent attacks.

Ramin Mehmanparast, and Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman,
"condemned the blasts and said that Israeli agents are often
the perpetrators of such terrorist acts,"
according to website
operated by Iran’s state-run Press TV. Iran’s state-run news agency (IRNA) also
quoted a government official who called Israel’s allegations
"a prelude to terrorist attacks against the Islamic
Republic."
 Moreover, Iranian
Ambassador Mohammad Khazaee—in a United Nations’ Security Council
letter—accused Israel of “masterminding camouflaged assassination attempts and
acts of terrorism or more specifically the so-called 'false flag operations,'
and attributing them to others."

Tensions between Israel and Iran have been especially high
since the killing of 32-year Iranian nuclear scientist Mostafa Ahmadi-Roshan in
early January. The Iranian government accused Israel of assassinating the
chemical engineer and of orchestrating a program to target Iranian nuclear
officials and institutions. It was the fifth time in two years that an Iranian
nuclear scientist, or, someone connected to Iran’s nuclear program was targeted.

The first scientist targeted was Masoud Ali-Mohammadi, who died after a bomb attached
to a motorcycle exploded in January 2010. Then in November 2010, senior
scientist Majid Shariari was killed and scientist Fereydoun Abbasi-Davani was wounded in two
separate, but simultaneous, motorcycle bombing attacks. Following those hits,
electronics expert Dariush
Rezaeinejad
was shot dead by two unknown assassins in Tehran.

Some analysts had argued forces within Iran are behind the killing of
the Iranian scientists, who some say may have been targeted for disloyalty.
However, others argue that Israel is the real culprit. Previously, French
newspaper LeFigaro reported that Israel had been recruiting Iranian dissidents
from a nearby Kurdish Iraq area for missions into Iran.

The prospects for a war between the West and Iran are real
and extremely troubling. No doubt President Obama is hoping that Israel doesn’t
attack Iran—at least not until after the November Presidential Elections. The
belligerent rhetoric against Iran has escalated not just in Israel but here in
America as well.

During Wednesday’s CNN Republican debate, in Arizona, all of
the Republican candidates—except for Congressman Ron Paul engaged in
irresponsible saber-rattling against Iran. Mitt Romney criticized President
Obama for cautioning Israel against attacking Iran. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich,
basically, stated his support for any military offensive by Israel. And Rick
Santorum mendaciously claimed the president wasn’t doing anything to curtail
Iran—despite the fact that President Obama has ratcheted up diplomatic pressure
and sanctions against Tehran.

The utter hypocrisy of Republicans is breathtaking. Aren’t
these the same people who’re telling us America needs an austerity program to
limit government spending? If there’s no money for domestic social programs to
help the needy, why are these pretenders clamoring to spend the people’s
treasury for yet another unnecessary war of aggression?

One has to wonder if these people haven’t learned anything
from the Iraq War. After spending trillions of dollars in Iraq, what has
America gained there —besides creating more contempt and alienating millions
more in Iraq and in the Muslim world? Isn’t it ironic the Iraq War made Iran a
stronger regional power?

The specter of Iran having nuclear bombs, and escalating an
arms race, is disturbing. No nation—period—should possess such weapons. However,
why is it Western nations feel they alone have the moral superiority to decide
who should, and shouldn’t, have nuclear weapons?

Unfortunately, nations know acquiring nuclear weapons is an
efficient deterrent against military invasion. The juxtaposition between the
cautious diplomacy the West employs when dealing with North Korea, in contrast to
the violent invasion and toppling of Iraq’s Saddam Hussein and Libya’s Muammar
al-Quathafi has made that crystal clear.

The warmongering policies of Washington and London has
increased the likelihood that others, besides Iran, will also seek to procure
nuclear—and other weapons of mass destruction—to prevent their nations from
becoming victims of unwanted military intervention. The fiery rhetoric of Washington
and Israel must be toned down for the peace and stability of the world.




"Speaking Truth To Empower."






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