Good! Africa Corruption Fight

-A +A
0

Other ex-governors face corruption charges in Nigeria. Maybe, slowly, the good old days of business as usual and looting of public coffers are coming to an end in Africa’s most populous country and the continent’s potential beacon.

Black Star Editorial



Just a few years ago it would have been unthinkable—for a Nigerian ex-governor, Dieprieye Alamieyeseigha, to plead guilty to money laundering charges and be sentenced to two years behind bars.

Alamieyeseigha, while governor of Bayelsa, became infamous after he jumped bail in connection with money laundering charges while in the U.K. allegedly disguised as a woman, and fled back to Nigeria, hoping for sanctuary.

Other ex-governors face corruption charges in Nigeria. Maybe, slowly, the good old days of business as usual and looting of public coffers are coming to an end in Africa’s most populous country and the continent’s potential beacon. The country still has far to travel as it reels from the recent Presidential election fiasco.

The measures against top officials who illegally amassed great wealth through theft of public funds is a good sign and should send a signal throughout Africa; political office should not be seen as a passport to theft and wealth.

In many African countries, corrupt government officials, with their equally corrupt foreign benefactors who offer bribes --yes, corruption is a two-way street, not an "African" thing-- still act with impunity. In Uganda even money that was earmarked to fight HIV/Aids was stolen by top officials; that’s worse than grave robbery.

Of course there is a long ways to go in Nigeria and through much of Africa. The good thing is that with modern methods of communications and increasing unwillingness of past foreign havens, including Swiss banks, to shield ill-gotten wealth, there is hope.

Yet much vigilance is still required from organizations that monitor such corruption and also culprits should be prosecuted domestically and in cases where they are shielded by corrupt governments, they should be placed on a list of International Wanted suspects, especially when the monies stolen come from International sources and organizations.

Good! About time.


To subscribe to or advertise in New York’s leading Pan African weekly investigative newspaper, please call (212) 481-7745 or send a note to Milton@blackstarnews.com


“Speaking Truth To Empower.”

Also Check Out...

HUNDREDS HEAD TOWARDS SOCIAL MEDIA
CPJ Welcomes Release of US
FORMER DEATH ROW INMATE GETS LAW
The Ray Rice Factor
WHITE AMERICAN FIGHTS TO SAVE HIS
FRENCH FIRM LOSES BID TO OWN