How Greed For Money Could Lead To George Zimmerman's Conviction on Murder Charge

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George Zimmerman is charged with murder of Trayvon Martin. Yet here is deceiving the court.


[Black Star News Editorial]
 
Now we understand what Michael Douglas's character Gordon Gekko meant in the movie Wall Street when he said "Greed is good." 

George
Zimmerman's wife Shellie Zimmerman, 25, was arrested Tuesday and later released
on $1,000 bond in connection with the lie the Zimmerman's concocted
during the April bail hearing.

George Zimmerman's bail was
revoked June 3 and he surrendered and is back behind bars. There is
another bail hearing June 29. Here's why he should be denied bail:

State
Attorney Angela Corey contends the couple lied to conceal the money
raised through a website, appealing to right wing elements, that George
Zimmerman had set up for his defense. At the time of the April bail
hearing the Zimmermans claimed they were paupers in order for him to
obtain a low bail, which was then set at $150,000; he paid the required 10% or $15,000 and walked out of jail.

Yet he had already raised more than
$130,000 from the website.

This total later went up to more than $200,000 according to
media accounts. Days before the April 22 bond hearing, Shellie Zimmerman
had transferred $74,000 of the money into her personal account. About
$50,000 was also transferred to an account controlled by Zimmerman's
sister. 
 
Zimmerman reportedly instructed Shellie to pay off all their bills with the money, including to American Express and Sams Club. 
 
Amazing what greed and money can do together.  
 
Here
is George Zimmerman, charged with the second degree murder of
17-year-old Trayvon Martin. Yet here is Zimmerman still focusing on money and knowingly engaging in a lie and a campaign to deceive the court.

Now, whenever he opens his mouth, the State will ask him: "Are you sure you're telling the truth this time?"

This newspaper never bought Zimmerman's account of
the incident that deprived Trayvon Martin of his life. We don't believe
that someone who calls police to report a "suspicious" character would
then still follow that "suspect" when told not to do so.

We
believe the stalker would only follow the "suspect" if he had pre-meditated
intention to use the weapon in his possession. Who in his right mind
would follow a "suspect" not knowing whether the "suspect" had a gun or
not?

Credibility is critical in this murder case since Trayvon can't give his side of the story.

Even
when faced with the possibility of a murder conviction, Zimmerman and
his wife chose to lie about money and conceal $130,000 that they wanted to save for their own
use. Some human nature is sometimes remarkable; and helpful, depending
on how one sees things.

Tempted by the $130,000 and even more,
Zimmerman undermined his own credibility. If he could lie for money
before the court even when faced with a murder trial might a jury not believe that his
account of the killing itself is suspect?

Zimmerman's conduct gives new meaning to the infamous three words uttered by Gordon Gekko. In Zimmerman's case, Gekko may be right.


"Speaking Truth To Empower."


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