Power: Millions More Movement!

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I can’t believe that it has been almost ten years since I stood amidst a sea of over one million Black men in Washington DC. Nothing ever proved the statement “strength in numbers� like the Million Man March did in October of 1995. I am especially proud to be part of the New York organizing committee for the Millions More Movement, the name chosen to commemorate not only the event ten years ago but also all of the other events that have led up to it.

My Beautfiul Black Brothers and Sisters, Big brother Usavior with the righteous flavor here, coming at you off of the heels of several positive notes. For starters, I share a birthday with brother Mumia Abu Jamal, (April 24). We honored him on Saturday, April 23rd with a huge march through Harlem that ended in a rally at the Salem United Methodist Church. Guest speakers included Pam Africa, one of the most prominent members of the Free Mumia Coalition and former Mayor David Dinkins. Nana Soul performed a moving poem dedicated to brother Mumia. Our May Day rally in Union Square was a huge success; several hundred people joined the Troops Out Now Coalition on May 1st to celebrate worker’s rights all over the world. Hosted by Leilani Dowell of Queers for Economic Justice, Erik-Anders Nilsson of the Jersey City Peace Movement, Nellie Hester Bailey of the Harlem Tenants Council and yours truly, it included performances by Nana Soul, Spiritchild and countless respected voices in the movement. Also, at the gracious invitation of Jay Godfrey of the United Methodist Seminar Program, I had the opportunity to speak at the United Nations with young students visiting from Virginia’s Richmond Community High School on May 28th, along with Abiodun of the Last Poets and Nana Soul. With all the provocative questions they asked about racism, the music industry, relationships and countless other issues that concern young people, they were proof positive that our children really are seeds, and when nourished with the right information they can only grow upward.  Richmond Community High, Black Waxx is proud of you! I can’t believe that it has been almost ten years since I stood amidst a sea of over one million Black men in Washington DC.

Nothing ever proved the statement “strength in numbers� like the Million Man March did in October of 1995. I am especially proud to be part of the New York organizing committee for the Millions More Movement, the name chosen to commemorate not only the event ten years ago but also all of the other events that have led up to it. It was such an inspiring event in history that even its spin offs garnered huge success (unlike most television sitcoms). After giving birth to the Million Woman March, The Million Family March, The Million Youth March and most recently, the Million Worker March, the upcoming anniversary event, the Millions More Movement is highly anticipated. Much has been done to dilute the power of our gatherings; one is drawn backward in time to the Million Youth March when then Mayor of New York Rudolph Ghouliani ordered his goon squad to attack peacefully assembled young people, and one man was hunted down and even threatened with death for allegedly throwing a bottle at a cop. Despite thoroughly planned agitation on the part of the City, each of these events went off without a hitch: no loss of life, no theft robbery or negativity on behalf of Black people. It makes you wonder: if they get so bent out of shape when we do something peaceful, can you imagine how they would scurry and freak out if we actually were coming for them in that way?

Then there was the fact that the media underestimated our numbers just like they always do every time we come out to protest this unjust system fraught with inequalities. Despite these overt attempts at sabotage, the fact that millions have attended these events speaks not only to Minister Louis Farrakhan’s organizing prowess, but also the inherent desire within Black people to see themselves amassed in one place with the purpose of mapping out strategies and plans for success. The image of being surrounded by nothing but Black faces from all over the nation is a powerful draw for many and disproves the myth that we are not connected by race. With all of our unique experiences, we are still one nation of people, and October 16th will serve as a reminder of that fact for years to come. It is imperative that we as Black people attend this march; this is a time where the powers that be continue to drill an apolitical ideology into youth and elders alike. We are constantly bombarded with images of the fast life, money, sex, drugs and rock & roll; so much so that we don’t spend enough time focusing on the issues that affect us directly. We will be more affected by who is in office and which laws are passed than we ever will by which new necklace Jay Z purchased for Beyonce, or how much more blonde weave she’s added to her already over burdened head. For example there aren’t enough messages that promote Black beauty or a strong Black family. In October, we will be able to nourish ourselves with these messages and others like them. The powers that be also try to divide us on the issue of religion.

Well, this is a Muslim thing isn’t it, many ask.  Some feel that if they are Christian they are not welcome. Once again we have to stop getting our information from the TELL LIE VISION. Farrakhan speaks constantly of the necessity for Black people to get together on the basis of our common experiences. We are Black before we are Muslim, Christian, Buddhist, Agnostic, etc. The Honorable Malcolm X said the same. So did Martin Luther King Jr. And they all had different political approaches. We cannot afford to be separated by ill-conceived notions of how different we are. They’ll shoot a Muslim just like they will a Christian. They oppress Buddhists just like they do Atheists. So, the focus of the march and rally in Washington on October 16th will not cater to any specific religion, so-called class or gender.  This is a march for Black people, organized by Black people with the intent to rebuild the inspirational fortitude of the Black family and empower all Black People everywhere.  Be there or beware. Revolution then peace, Usavior

Black Star columnist and social activist Usavior can be reached through
usavior@blackwaxx.com For more articles and reports please call (212) 481-7745 for the newsstand edition of The Black Star News. Also visit blackwaxx.com

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