Trayvon: Killed For Walking While Black

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Trayvon loved building models and taking things apart, his favorite subject was math, and he dreamed of becoming a pilot and an engineer. Instead, he was gunned down by a self-appointed neighborhood watch captain vigilante who profiled him, followed him, and shot him in the chest.


Every parent raising Black sons knows the
dilemma: deciding how soon to have the talk. Choosing the words to
explain to your beautiful child that there are some people who will
never like or trust him just because of who he is—including some who
should be there to protect him, but will instead have the power to hurt
him. Training him how to walk, what to say, and how to act so he won’t
seem like a threat. Teaching him that the burden of deflating
stereotypes and reassuring other people’s ignorance will always fall on
him, and while that isn’t fair, in some cases it may be the only way to
keep him safe and alive.

But sometimes it isn’t enough. It wasn’t
enough to protect Trayvon Martin. Seventeen-year-old Trayvon’s English
teacher said he was “an A and B student who majored in cheerfulness.”
Trayvon loved building models and taking things apart, his favorite
subject was math, and he dreamed of becoming a pilot and an engineer.
Instead, he was gunned down by a self-appointed neighborhood watch
captain vigilante who profiled him, followed him, and shot him in the
chest.

His killer, George Zimmerman, saw the teenager on the street and
called the police to report he looked “like he’s up to no good.” At the
time Trayvon was walking home from the nearby 7-11 carrying a bottle of
Arizona iced tea and a bag of Skittles for his younger stepbrother,
leaving many people to guess that the main thing he was doing that made
him look “no good” was wearing a hooded sweatshirt in the rain and
walking while Black. George Zimmerman’s decisions made that suspicious
enough to be a death sentence.

Now there is widespread outrage over the
senseless killing of a young Black man who was doing nothing wrong and
the fact that the man who killed him has not been arrested. People are
trying to make sense of the series of gun laws that allowed George
Zimmerman to act as he did—starting with the Florida laws that allowed
someone like Zimmerman, who had previously been charged for resisting
arrest with violence and battery on a police officer, to get a permit to
carry a concealed weapon in the first place. Many more questions are
being raised about Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law, which also has
been described as the “shoot first, ask questions later” law, and gives
the benefit of the doubt to Zimmerman and others claiming “self-defense”
by allowing people who say they are in imminent danger to defend
themselves. Some states limit this defense to people’s own homes, but
others, like Florida, allow it anywhere.

As Josh Horwitz, executive director of the
Coalition to Stop Gun Violence, says, this law “has turned common
law—and common sense—on its head by enabling vigilantes to provoke
conflicts, resolve them with deadly force, and avoid ever having to set
foot in a courtroom.” The fear in Trayvon’s death is that this is
exactly what has happened so far: that the story told by witnesses,
phone records, and Zimmerman’s violent past and earlier complaints
during his neighborhood patrols shows an overzealous armed aggressor who
followed Trayvon even after police told him to stop, chased Trayvon
down when the frightened boy tried to walk away from the stranger
following him, and then shot the unarmed, 100-pounds-lighter teenager
while neighbors said they heard a child crying for help. The prospect
now that Zimmerman might never set foot in a courtroom for the shooting
has caused widespread frustration and fury.

Just as sadly, Trayvon’s death was not unique. In 2008 and 2009, 2,582 Black children
and teens were killed by gunfire. Black children and teens were only 15 percent of the child
population, but 45 percent of the 5,740 child and teen gun deaths in those two years. Black
males 15 to 19 years-old were eight times as likely as White males to be gun homicide victims.

The outcry over Trayvon’s death is absolutely right and just. We need the same sense of outrage
over every one of these child deaths. Above all, we need a nation where these senseless deaths
no longer happen. But we won’t get it until we have common-sense gun laws that protect
children instead of guns and don’t allow people like George Zimmerman to take the law into
their own hands.

We won’t get it until we have a culture that sees every child as a child of God
and sacred, instead of seeing some as expendable statistics, and others as threats and “no good”
because of the color of their skin or because they chose to walk home wearing a hood in the rain.
And we won’t get it until enough of us—parents and grandparents—stand up and tell our
political leaders that the National Rifle Association should not be in charge of our
neighborhoods, streets, gun laws, and values. In Trayvon’s case, his father Tracy speaks for
what his family needs: “The family is calling for justice. We don’t want our son’s death to be in
vain.” I hope that enough voices will ensure that it is not.


Marian Wright Edelman is President of the Children's Defense Fund

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