Black Men Are Pushed To Pursue Sports. Why Not Medicine?

Former NFL player Nate Hughes above became a doctor after his football career ended.
-A +A
0

Photo: Because of Them We Can

Former NFL player Nate Hughes above became a doctor after his football career ended.

Aaron Bolds didn’t consider becoming a physician until he tore a ligament in his knee while playing in a basketball tournament when he was 15. His orthopedic surgeon was Black, and they hit it off. “He was asking me how my grades were, and I told him, ‘I’m a straight-A student,’ and he was, like, ‘Man, this is a great fallback plan if basketball doesn’t work out,’” recalls Bolds, who is African American.

“He looked like me,” Bolds says, “and that was even more encouraging.”

If not for that chance encounter, Bolds, 34, a doctor at Mount Sinai Health System in New York, might never have gone into medicine, he says. When he was growing up, there were no physicians in his family or extended social network to model that career path. And at the schools he attended, he says, his aptitude for science didn’t trigger the kind of guidance young people often receive in more privileged contexts.

Read more.

Also Check Out...

British troops have shot dead jihadists, believed to be Isis fighters, after coming under attack while on a UN mission in Mali
British Troops Shoot And Kill Isis
NBA is announcing plans to develop new programs and events at HBCUs
NBA Commits To Expanding
pro-democracy demonstrators have taken to the streets of the Sudanese capital Khartoum and other major cities
Sudan: Protesters Take To Streets
Republicans on Wednesday again blocked Democrats from advancing sweeping federal voting rights legislation,
Voting Rights: What Will Democrats
Renewable energy employment worldwide reached 12 million last year
IRENA: Renewable Energy Jobs Reach
Southern states’ failure to prioritize public education
Report Analyzes School Funding