Review: The Iceberg (L’Iceberg)

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FILM REVIEW

No one notices when Fiona (Fiona Gordon), the manager of a fast food restaurant in Brussels, accidentally locks herself inside a walk-in refrigerator one night after closing. Not even her husband, Julien (Dominique Abel), or either of their two kids (Ophélie Rousseau and Robin Goupil).

After she’s finally freed the next morning, it becomes readily apparent to this reliable woman that she has come to be taken for granted for granted by everyone. And hen, while futilely attempting to thaw out, she experiences an epiphany which has her reevaluating her priorities in life.

Physically, Fiona now craves the cold, and the normally dependable mother and boss impulsively abandons her family and job in search of a fabled, faraway iceberg. She enlists the assistance of Rene (Philippe Martz) in this regard, a deaf giant with a tiny sailboat.

With more than a hint of romance in the air, like modern Captain Ahabs, the two set out for the Arctic, Fiona’s alerted hubby soon in hot pursuit. So unfolds The Iceberg, a charming slapstick comedy from Belgium. Silent for long stretches, though always visually engaging and endlessly inventive, the oft inane antics onscreen are most reminiscent of the best bits by the rubber-faced Mr. Bean.

However, this production does that hapless Brit one better, because not only is it funny, but it simultaneously takes time out to explore a variety of themes including love, loyalty, friendship and one’s relationship with oneself before delivering at a heartwarming message that maybe there’s no place like home after all.

Excellent (4 stars). Unrated. In French with subtitles. Running time: 84 minutes
Studio: First Run Features


Summ:

 

Summ:
Physically, Fiona now craves the cold, and the normally dependable mother and boss impulsively abandons her family and job in search of a fabled, faraway iceberg.

Review: The Iceberg
(L’Iceberg)

By Kam Williams

No one notices when Fiona (Fiona Gordon), the manager of a fast food restaurant in Brussels, accidentally locks herself inside a walk-in refrigerator one night after closing. Not even her husband, Julien (Dominique Abel), or either of their two kids (Ophélie Rousseau and Robin Goupil).

After she’s finally freed the next morning, it becomes readily apparent to this reliable woman that she has come to be taken for granted for granted by everyone. And hen, while futilely attempting to thaw out, she experiences an epiphany which has her reevaluating her priorities in life.

Physically, Fiona now craves the cold, and the normally dependable mother and boss impulsively abandons her family and job in search of a fabled, faraway iceberg. She enlists the assistance of Rene (Philippe Martz) in this regard, a deaf giant with a tiny sailboat.

With more than a hint of romance in the air, like modern Captain Ahabs, the two set out for the Arctic, Fiona’s alerted hubby soon in hot pursuit. So unfolds The Iceberg, a charming slapstick comedy from Belgium. Silent for long stretches, though always visually engaging and endlessly inventive, the oft inane antics onscreen are most reminiscent of the best bits by the rubber-faced Mr. Bean.

However, this production does that hapless Brit one better, because not only is it funny, but it simultaneously takes time out to explore a variety of themes including love, loyalty, friendship and one’s relationship with oneself before delivering at a heartwarming message that maybe there’s no place like home after all.

Excellent (4 stars). Unrated. In French with subtitles. Running time: 84 minutes
Studio: First Run Features

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