Racism and Segregation deeply ingrained in Latin America

Latin American cities tend to be fairly racially mixed, but many wealthy neighborhoods are nearly exclusively white.
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[Racism in Latin America]
Race still plays a role in determining the chances many people in Latin America have in life and whether they are targeted by the police.
Photo: Twitter

In the ongoing global racial reckoning that erupted after George Floyd's murder, the entrenched nature of racism in Latin American countries is also now being examined.

The media in Latin America has condemned the racial injustice in the U.S. and the ongoing civil rights violations. The newspapers have reported extensively on the murder of George Floyd and the protests since then.

However, they are largely quiet about racism and segregation in Latin America.

In one of the most ethnically diverse regions in the world, people may have the idea they live in racial democracy, but the facts do not support this.

Race still plays a role in determining the chances many people in Latin America have in life and whether they are targeted by the police.

Structural and institutional segregation

According to the World Bank, Latin America is home to approximately 28 million indigenous people and about 150 million Afro-Latinos.

Combined, this amounts to around 40% of the population and yet they are the poorest segment and have less access to health, education and social welfare than others.

They also have a tougher time finding employment.

Latin American cities tend to be fairly racially mixed, but many wealthy neighborhoods are nearly exclusively white.

Latin America has high homicide rates and police forces kill in greater numbers than in the United States.

Read rest of story here: https://www.newsamericasnow.com/racism-in-latin-america/

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