Third Annual Creole Food Festival Starts In NYC August 7th

The first and only Creole Food Festival is back for its 3rd year —after a brief hiatus due to the pandemic. The four-city festiv
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Photo: Creole Food Festival

(New York, NY) July, 2021—The first and only Creole Food Festival is back for its 3rd year —after a brief hiatus due to the pandemic. The four-city festival will kick off in New York City on Saturday, August 7, 2021 at Skinny’s Cantina on the Hudson, located at 701 West 133rd Street, NY. The 6,500 square feet bi-level indoor and outdoor venue will showcase top Creole chefs of color from multiple continents over a two-day immersive culinary experience with authentic dishes from the Caribbean, South America, Africa, Latin America, and the Southern United States.

For the last three years--this sold-out event has brought hundreds of guests together for an experience of the best Creole celebrity chefs, cuisines, and beverages. Guests will sample dishes created specifically for the festival along with having the opportunity to interact with the chefs, many of whom are current resident judges and hosts of top television cooking shows.

“The Creole Food Festival uses culinary excellence as a unifying thread amongst chefs and restaurants from Africa, South America, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Southern United States. We founded the Creole Food Festival in order to provide a platform for Black and brown chefs to display their talent and creativity while adhering to the authenticity of their respective regions.” - Fabrice J. Armand, co-founder of Creole Food Festival.

Creole Cuisine is a style of cooking which blends French, Spanish, West & North African, Amerindian, Haitian & Portuguese influences. This annual festival aims to create a lasting tradition of showcasing the best of the cuisine, with a focus on its historical and cultural influences that tie these various regions together.

“We created the Creole Food Festival to showcase the brilliance of Black and brown chefs from the diaspora, and introduce a whole new audience to these magnificent cuisines.” - Elkhair Balla, co-founder of Creole Food Festival.

The Creole Food Festival’s four city tour will include New Orleans, Washington D.C. and will end its season in Miami. For more information on the New York City Experience visit www.creolefoodfestival.com. The event is open to the public and tickets can be purchased via Eventbrite.

The Creole Food Festival is the nation’s only food festival dedicated to celebrating the rich diversity and interconnectedness of Creole cuisine from across the globe. Founded by Fabrice J. Armand and Elkhair Balla in 2018, the festival aims to be an educational platform to showcase award winning, trailblazing chefs of color leading the wave of Creole cuisine, creating awareness around global food traditions, and serving as a meeting point for enthusiasts, connoisseurs, and industry professionals. Programming will include cooking demonstrations, live musical performances, educational panels, and food competitions. This year’s festival has expanded and will take place in four major US cities: New York City, New Orleans, Washington, D.C., and Miami. For more information, please visit www.creolefoodfestival.com. Follow us on Facebook (@CreoleFoodFestival) and Instagram (@CreoleFoodFest). #CreoleFoodFest.

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