Minority Cops Accuse NYPD of Targeting Blacks, Latinos in Affidavit

 Lt. Edwin Raymond (above) previously made: that NYPD brass pressured Black and Latino cops to target, ticket and arrest Black a
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Four NYPD officers, in a new affidavit, are repeating the charges that Lt. Edwin Raymond (above) previously made: that NYPD brass pressured Black and Latino cops to target, ticket and arrest Black and Latino New Yorkers.

Four NYPD officers say in new sworn declarations that an off-the-books arrest quota system targeted Black and Latino New Yorkers — with one cop recalling a white supervisor asking, “Are you going to take someone’s freedom today?”

The new documents, soon to be filed in Manhattan Federal Court the Daily News has learned, add further detail to a long-running suit launched by four other minority cops claiming they faced retaliation for not arresting enough people of color. White officers allegedly did not face the arrest expectations. Officer Charles Spruill, who retired in 2014, has come forward to claim he was yelled at on a daily basis to meet arrest quotas.

“On one occasion in the 40th Precinct a white supervisor asked an African-American police officer, ‘Are you going to take someone’s freedom today?’” Spruill, who is Black, says in his affidavit.

Read rest of story here.

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