Prosecutor In Brooklyn: R. Kelly’s “Case Is About A Predator”

Kelly, a three-time Grammy winner whose songs include “I Believe I Can Fly” and “Bump N’ Grind,” has pleaded not guilty to a nin
-A +A
0

Photos: YouTube\Twitter

NEW YORK (Reuters) - R. Kelly is a “predator” who demanded absolute fealty from the many women and underage girls he recruited for sex in a two-decade racketeering scheme, a federal prosecutor said on Wednesday as the R&B superstar’s sex abuse trial began.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Maria Melendez told a jury of seven men and five women in Brooklyn federal court that Kelly used “lies, manipulation, threats and physical abuse” to dominate his victims, and often filmed their sexual encounters.

Melendez said Kelly, 54, would require victims to get his permission before doing virtually anything, including going to the bathroom, and blackmail them by threatening to release self-incriminating letters he forced them to write if they fled.

“This case is about a predator,” Melendez said in her opening statement. “This case is not about a celebrity who likes to party a lot.”

Kelly, a three-time Grammy winner whose songs include “I Believe I Can Fly” and “Bump N’ Grind,” has pleaded not guilty to a nine-count indictment that also includes accusations of bribery and extortion.

Read rest here.

Also Check Out...

In the favelas and peripheries of Brazil, arbitrary arrests—lacking proof and motivated by race
Racial Policing: In Brazil, Crime
Meet Claudienne Hibbert-Smith,
Black Woman Making History In The
Mali has marked its 61st anniversary of the country’s independence from France.
Mali Marks 61st Independence Day
Educators, like art teacher George Galbreath, whose art is shown above, continue to face decisions in the classroom
Educator Uses Art To Showcase
“Freedom to Vote” Act, a compromise bill that would expand and protect the right to vote
Democrats Must Pass Voting Rights
oppressive laws curtailing human rights including the rights to freedom of expression and peaceful assembly,
Gambia: Oppressive Laws Remain