Breonna Taylor: Movement to Limit Police Raids Looks Beyond 'No-Knock' Warrants

"No-knock" search warrants, (like the one used in Breonna Taylor's murder)
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"No-knock" search warrants, (like the one used in Breonna Taylor's murder) which allow police to force their way into a home with the element of surprise, have attracted criticism since the height of the "war on drugs" in the 1980s and 90s.

But it wasn't until this year that the death of Breonna Taylor galvanized that criticism into a national movement to ban the raids.

Taylor was shot to death in her own apartment during a questionable drug raid by Louisville police.

Now she's become a symbol.

"Do we really want to be jeopardizing the lives of individuals for drug searches?" asks Connor Boyack, founder of the Libertas Institute, a Libertarian think tank in Utah which is pushing for new limits on forcible entry raids.

"We've seen it in Utah, we've seen it with Breonna Taylor," he says. "We're losing lives with this, on both sides of the firearm, and so is it worth it?"

Read rest of story here.

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