Death Row: Texas Lawmakers Pray With Melissa Lucio

Sign petition to tell Texas to stop execution plan for Melissa Lucio!
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Photos: Innocence Project\Rep Jeff Leach

This week, a group of bipartisan Texas lawmakers visited Melissa Lucio on death row to offer their support, encouragement and prayers. Melissa was wrongfully convicted and sentenced to death after her 2-year-old daughter Mariah died in 2007 following an accidental fall.

She is currently on death row and scheduled to be executed by the State of Texas on April 27, 2022.

Texas State Reps. Jeff Leach, a Republican, and Joe Moody, a Democrat, led the group of seven lawmakers to the facility where the state houses women on death row. “We are blessed to have the opportunity to meet with Melissa, to pray with her, to spend time with her and we’re more resolute and committed than ever to fighting over the next three weeks to save her life,” said Rep. Leach.

Melissa Lucio (wearing white) leads a prayer along with 7 Texas representatives, asking God for clemency.

We’re doing everything we can to stop the execution of Melissa Lucio. As Rep. Leach tweeted, “Justice matters. Mercy matters. She matters. We have three weeks to save the life of Melissa Lucio and we plan on doing everything we can between now and then to prevent this irreversible stain on the Lone Star State.”

Sign petition to tell Texas to stop execution of Melissa Lucio!

By Innocence Project

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